#PregnancyProblems: Picking a Mattress for Better Sleep Before and After Baby

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Congratulations on your pregnancy! Expecting a baby is exciting, but it also puts your body and your partner through many changes over 9 months. To ride through any pregnancy problems with as much energy and comfort as possible, you need restful sleep before and after the latest little family member arrives. Every person’s experience with pregnancy is different, and each trimester brings new challenges, so getting the quantity and quality of shut-eye you need might seem daunting. Don’t worry, Momma! We’ve gathered expert advice to help you find the right mattress, and lets you practice snooze-inducing habits for this new chapter in your life.

Whether this is your first pregnancy or your third, these tips for sleeping better while pregnant will increase your quality of sleep for a healthier, happier pregnancy (and partner!).

What You Need from a Mattress During and After Pregnancy

Many people don’t know they’re pregnant until they’re approaching the second trimester. But if you’ve found out you’re expecting during the first 12 weeks, you’ve got time on your side. And time is an advantage when it comes to balancing pregnancy and sleep. Experts at the National Sleep Foundation recommend you use this time to practice healthy habits and sleeping in positions that will be more comfortable later in pregnancy.

Your Body Is Changing, So Should Your Mattress

To prepare for the changes your body is experiencing, find a great mattress that will adjust to your needs throughout your entire pregnancy. During the next several weeks, your body is going to change in size and proportions—not that you needed a reminder—and in energy and comfort levels. You might even experience nausea and heartburn, both of which can lead to insomnia on traditional mattresses.

Comfort is subjective, but you may find that you need a firmer mattress to give your spine much-needed support as you carry your pregnancy on different areas of your body. The groundbreaking adjustable Revive Hybrid Premier mattress by isense gives you the support of an innerspring mattress with a plush sleep surface to cushion every curve and relieve joint pain. As you and your partner navigate your pregnancy, you can adjust each side of the bed separately and as often as you need to adapt to each new stage of your changing body.

An Adjustable Base and Pillow Will be Your Bed’s Dynamic Duo

It’s time for an authentic conversation about pregnancy and sleep. Swollen legs and ankles happen, so do acid reflux and hemorrhoids. Fortunately, there’s technology to help you overcome those pregnancy problems. No, we haven’t developed the ability to fast-forward to your child’s birth. But we do have a convenient bed base that empowers you to elevate your head and feet to relieve discomfort related to both digestion and circulation issues you may experience during pregnancy. The Elite Adjustable Base is compact and streamlined, so you won’t feel like you’re in a clunky hospitable bed while you’re trying to get your best sleep at home. Plus, the king size is available with dual-control, so you and your partner can customize your comfort independently without compromising on a great night’s sleep.

Most experienced parents will tell you to stock up on pillows. An adjustable mattress is a must, but to get into each new contour of your body, an adjustable pillow (or two) will be your hero. Our Classic Adjustable Pillow conforms to your sleeping positions and fits wherever you need additional moisture-wicking comfort. Move your pillows around to support easy breathing or place one between your knees to relieve pressure on your back and hips when you sleep on your side. Body pillows quickly lose their shape, but king-size adjustable pillows from isense run the length of most torsos and legs and support you all night. By the way, we’ll cover the healthiest and most comfortable sleeping position for people who are pregnant in the next section, so hold tight.

The Best Sleep Positions During Pregnancy

According to the National Sleep Foundation report mentioned above, you don’t necessarily have to change your sleep position during the first trimester. However, if your go-to sleep style will make sleeping tough in a few weeks, the first trimester is an opportune time to get your body used to a new position. But which sleep position is best during pregnancy? According to the American Pregnancy Association and most prenatal experts, the best sleep position during pregnancy is on your left side.

Among experts, sleeping on your left side is one of the top tips for sleeping better while pregnant, because this allows more circulation and nutrients to reach the placenta. It’s also more comfortable for your digestive system, and takes pressure off of major blood vessels, including the aorta and vena cava. Keep your knees gently bent and separate them with your adjustable pillow. If you experience some shoulder stiffness while sleeping on your side, “hug” another pillow to round out your chest.

To improve circulation and relieve hemorrhoids and ankle swelling (no, thank you!), avoid sleeping on your back during your second and third trimester. If you wake up and find out you’ve been sleeping on your back, that’s OK. Your body is just trying to get comfortable while doing the hard work of growing a baby. Gently adjust yourself and settle in for more sleep.

Sleeping on your front is also tempting—at least during the first and second trimester—but it can be painful for your abdomen and breasts once you’re well into the third trimester. Use pillows or adjust your bed base to help you sleep more securely on your side. You’ll see the benefits of better quality sleep, even if it takes some time to get used to a new position.

Self-Care Tips for Sleeping Better While Pregnant

When you share the exciting news of your pregnancy, experienced parents will likely joke about how little sleep you’ll get before and after the baby is born. Well, there are some easy habits that will help you tackle those pregnancy problems as individuals and as a couple. Practice these tips for sleeping while pregnant to create a restful night’s sleep and a healthy family.

  • Prioritize your sleep. We can’t say this enough. Your body is doing the heavy lifting to grow your family. Invest in getting better-quality sleep to rest and restore yourself.
  • Don’t worry about doing it right. Everyone seems to have advice about how you should take care of yourself during pregnancy. But sleep and comfort are very subjective, and one approach does not fit all. Trying to follow everyone else’s advice can add stress, which is the last thing you need when you’re trying to fall asleep.
  • Skip watching TV in bed. Yes, we just told you to do what you want, but this is really important. Electronic devices, like your television, laptop and phone, emit blue light, which studies have shown disrupts REM (resting eye movement) sleep cycles and makes it harder to feel rested and refreshed.
  • Think of your room as a sleep sanctuary. Channel your “nesting” energy. This is a great time for you and your partner to make long-lasting changes in your sleep environment, including soothing lights, soft white noise and high-quality bedding.
  • Communicate with your doctor. You talk with your obstetrician (and doula) about the nutrients you need to sustain a pregnancy and the kinds of physical activities that will keep you healthy. Don’t forget to mention your sleep patterns and energy levels, as well. An OB/GYN can help you make adjustments as you experience each stage of your pregnancy.

Pregnancy takes you and your partner on an adventure with plenty of surprises and twists and turns. In response, your body needs quality sleep to rejuvenate each night. That’s why it’s important to equip yourself with effective tools and tips for sleeping while pregnant, starting with an adjustable mattress that adapts to each stage of your pregnancy.

Embrace your best night’s sleep now and as a parent for years to come, and say goodbye to #PregnancyProblems. 

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